Tag Archives: software

Atacac – using game technology to turn fashion upside down

“We want to show a completely new way to produce and sell fashion. Another world is possible” says Atacac founder Richard Lindqvist. With a renowned career as a fashion designer running his own studio as well as consulting mega brands such as Vivienne Westwood topped with a PhD he was ready for a new adventure. Together with Jimmy Herdberg, digital creative and founder of studio Kokokaka, he decided to try a new radical approach with starting a fashion studio that had very little in common with fashion production as we know it.

The studio – Atacac founded in Gothenburg, Sweden in 2016, does not only apply innovative ideas on garment construction but also new models on how to sell and price products. Using 3D software traditionally used by the game industry, Atacac generates realistic 3D models of the garments and selling them online to customers instead of already existing products, cutting stock-holding and over production out from the production chain. The Atacac on-demand model is using pricing in the same way as flight tickets – the earlier products are purchased the better the price. Keeping the entire production chain in one spot can enable an end to end process of only a few days – something the bigger fashion brands can only dream of. Atacac is a fresh example of a small innovative player challenging a slow and unsustainable fashion industry, enabled by game technologies. But how does it work and what is its goal? Rickard and Jimmy elaborates on potential futures from their studio at Ringön.

 

Is Atacac a brand using new technologies in selling its products or a technology platform using a brand?

-We see Atacac as a creative fashion studio. This studio is elaborating with new technologies with the aim to reinvent the fashion industry. As a part of this, we do among other things run the Atacac brand and the Atacac micro-factory.

-We are currently elaborating with custom-made services together with some chosen customers. In this project, the customer downloads the 3D model together with the 2D pattern from our shareware section. She then re-designs the garment and sends the digital garment back to the Atacac micro-factory (aka 3d printer for garments) for production. We see a huge potential in making digital products available for consumers, which might eventually lead to major changes in how we relate to products, brands and production. Soon altering 3D models will be a public domain.

 

 When launching Atacac as a service, what parts didn’t work as expected? What has been your main challenges building your business?

-Delays in producing abroad made us start our own in-house micro factory for being able to elaborate with super-quick turnover times. This was not a part of the original intention but turned out to be an important part of the creative work.

You are surfing global top trends using local manufacturing with short production cycles, on-demand production and unconventional pricing models towards a more sustainable fashion industry. Will it be possible for the bigger players in the industry to adopt this way of selling products?

-Our proposals for ways of working is primarily developed from a creative perspective. We believe that the consequences of a good creative work is profitable from many perspectives. Expressional, economical and sustainable ones for example.

-Yes, it will be possible for larger companies to adopt this way of working. Most companies will have to change the ways they work in order to still be around. Some will be successful in doing so while others will disappear and be replaced by new ones.


 

What is the end goal for Atacac? Will you scale up the core brand or rather keep it small selling the platform to other brands as a service? Will Atacac ever be a multi brand platform?

-Our goal is to develop creatively and to inspire. We change from day to day. We have no end goal, there is only the end of the day. Atacac as a brand will be scaled up, to which scale is an open question.

-In a way Atacac already is a multi brand platform. As a part of elaborating with the future of retail we recently we started a monthly Fashion-Art-Technology market, that we call F.A.T market, in our studio every last Saturday of the month. We invited other brands, artists and companies to sell their things next to our products. Some of the other fashion brands produce their garments in the Atacac micro factory. This could very well also develop into a virtual multi brand community as we deliver both a digital and a physical product from the factory.

 

 

Atacac

CLO

Kokokaka

 

Fashion magician Jacob Kok

Dutch Jacob Kok proves what research already knows about the characteristics of an innovator – double degrees.  Having background in animation he stepped in to the role as a fashion designer ending up winning the Dutch version of the well-known tv series Project Runway. However his journey in to the high fashion world did not end up just building a ready-to-use fashion line but followed the path concept of an “Evolution” – the name of one of his  collections that brought him in to a groundbreaking collaboration with software company Autodesk.

– How did you really end up working with Autodesk Jakob?

– After seeing a demonstration of the 123D Catch application I was instantly intrigued and impressed Autodesk is able to offer such complex technology in such an accessible way. I contacted them to work together, and they were up for it, curious and excited like me.

Using the app 123D Catch the Evolution collection is brought to life letting the user rotate and interact with the model, zoom and examine the garments in detail. A digital fashion experience far from convention.

It is not the only virtual collaboration Jacob has taken on. In 2013 he presented his “Paradise” Collection, a both physical and virtual fashion experience brought to the runway as well as on the famous game platform The Sims by Electronic Arts. Without compromising his psychedelic, spectacular aesthetics  he entered the game industry.

– I’m generally very attracted to the game aesthetics, and I like the idea of interaction. Fashion is very personal, but fashion shows can be distant and impersonal. I’m working towards a similar playful interaction between fashion and the wearer. 

Jacob Kok_sims
Lover of aesthetic “tackiness” and “awkwardness” his specific style in fashion entered the virtual every-day life in the Sims. As a concept, you downloaded Jacobs collection to use on your very own Sims character.

Your aesthetics differ from most of the art in the video game industry, what were the reactions to the Sims collection?

– As a statement it worked very well, and people in fashion were excited about the project, but obviously people that got to play with it were mostly gamers. They were, to say it mildly, not into it at all.

You have now been making collections that both have a physical and a digital life, claiming that virtuality gives fashion new dimensions. Would you consider only making the garments digitally, or are they mutually dependent?

– Fashion is in essence about people wearing it. Even though the core of my work is about visual stimulation I tend to find it necessary to also work towards a physical purpose. I would like to state I can fully let go of the physical and investigate solely the virtual, but something inside me tells me I need to work on both. 

Jacob Kok

 

You are working in an innovation landscape of virtual technology with many possible directions such as art, computer games, online retail, product development etc. What path would you want to take from now if you could choose?

– At the moment I’m working towards a broader interpretation of my vision, approaching my brand as a design studio. Doing so I don’t restrict myself to any field. The vision and the fascination need to be guiding me.

Jacob Kok_Evolution

 

 

Jacob Kok

futureoffashion.nl

 

Also read about Virtual Prototyping 

 

virtual prototyping

-It’s as if I was in a computer game. Once you know the rules, you can play for hours’, explains Design student Jennifer Droguett. This virtual “game” is 3D virtual prototyping software developed by Lectra. Designing clothes with this technology can feel like playing a game with an avatar

Software for garment prototyping seems to continue winning ground in the fashion industry and fashion schools worldwide are preparing their students for a new, 3D oriented craft landscape.

Tech company Lectra recently collaborated with dutch AMFI in letting the students innovate with their virtual 3D software.  High function aswell as more experimental suggestions were made.

AMFI teachers stress the fact that a fashion designer of today need to know the physical craft aswell as keep up with new technology.

lectrafashion

-For companies such as Adidas and Nike the virtualization of their collections is already implemented. By reducing samples they reduce costs, that’s a fact

-Fashion companies like Dior Homme and other fashion brands are following. They will all need the 21st century designers that graduate with these 3D skills in their portfolio. (AMFI)

Alicia Isabelle

 

virtual

AMFI 

Lectra

Also read about Marvelous Designer  

 

Marvelous Designer brings real pattern making technique and 3d software together

 

While as the majority of the worlds cg artists still make character outfits in traditional 3d software manner, Marvelous designer is a software that rather uses traditional pattern making to create virtual clothing. Because of it’s compatibility with other 3d software it is already in use by 3d artists at game and film studios around the world as in Weta Digital’s the Hobbit and Ubisofts Assasin’s Creed. The company claims the technique to both make outstanding fabric and detail replicas and at the same time save time for the CG artist.  If this new approach to virtual clothing hits it big remains to be seen.

 

 

www.marvelousdesigner.com/

Also read about Lectra fashion software